How to Roast Coffee Beans on a Sailboat

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADeceptively simple. Somehow roasting coffee became a snobbish sport. However, let’s get started now and make a very tasty cup of #coffee while aboard your boat. Better yet, have some fun and save money too.sweetmaria

Buy some green coffee beans. Green coffee beans last a long time on a sailboat. Heck, you could provision enough for a few years and not lose much storage space. I personally recommend visiting Sweet Maria’s website @ sweetmarias.com. It’s a great site for a lot of reasons.

You need fire, but you probably already have that on your boat. If not consider a basic pressurized kerosene portable stove. stoveThese burn hotter than you need, whereas a wick stove is not hot enough.

You also need a cast iron small kettle. The cast iron retains the heat and soaks it into the bean. Thin metal pots and pans don’t work on a sailboat especially in the winter. Smaller is better and the rounded bottocastiron_m is nice for stirring. My favorite is from lodgemfg.com , a mini wok or small kettle. Grab something to stir the handful of beans. I use a cheap bamboo spatula. A wooden spoon would be fine too. I don’t like metal but you might.

Now for the fun. Light the burner and put your iron pot on the stove. Give yourself at least 15 min at low setting to heat the pot. Next grab a handful of beans and stir stir stir. Keep the beans in motion. If you get too much smoke, it’s too hot. You hear cracking as the beans turn brown. Keep stirring if you like darker roasts. The second crack is a very dark roasted bean and is louder. Not too fast and not too slow, just like #sailing.

Pour the beans into a bowl and let cool. Later you remove the chafe by pouring the beans from one bowl to another while a nice breeze is blowing. Removing chafe is optional and I personally don’t. Your beans are now ready for grinding. Enjoy!

 

S/V LAGNIAPPE RadioEmail on 2018-02-17 11:22:47Z

Weightless startled and frightened, Ito clamors for any resemblance of basis and foundation, any position for reference. Flail, scream, shout, breath, emote anything because this place has no importance or weight or direction outwardly imposed inward. This place has no desire of self dissonant ensemble.

His delusive sight confusing other senses and eyes open or closed cannot affirm what is happening nor when, nor provide any visual time reference. It may be real because it feels real.

The band racing on land find amidst their crowded passage one only common goal of fear. Fearing not to be first, gobbling up wayward path and consumption faster than the next without anything left aside from a narrow channel of self interest. Companionship pushed to the limit of repugnant disdain as the path before them moves behind in a flash. A voluntary participation together and by choice fueled by fear imprison each participant and ironically sealing their own solitary confinement..

The group separate and snap apart somehow and in an unexpected unforeseen absence, and with a rather odd twist play upon their visual path with an unspoken forward bridge to that of a tiny pebble free falling into the blue ocean.

There instantly is solitude, a suffocating fear of no longer a participant. It matters not where or how or when, but that companionship is palpably absent and left in the wake appear Ito’s path of enlightenment. That tiny pebble soon to reach its serendipitous destination is already prepared to strike a new world below from which ripples flow outward in time and rhythm far to distant shore.

***MSG ID START***
Radio Email transmitting aboard Sailing Vessel LAGNIAPPE
DateTime : 2018-02-17 05:22:47
UTC DateTime : 2018-02-17 11:22:47Z
Day : Saturday
UTC Day : Saturday
Ship Callsign : KD0DVH /MM
USCG NO.1248074 :: SFJFC027C787
EPIRB BeaconID 2DCC5 EF14A FFBFF
RadioEmail: kd0dvh@winlink.org
Follow Lagniappe and her crew @
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***END TRANSMISSION***

S/V LAGNIAPPE RadioEmail on 2018-02-09 20:45:11Z

Gestures in the Waves

Fog, or perhaps dense mist and darkness surround the little sailboat, obscuring and muffling ambient sound. A old chronometer attached to its bulkhead isn’t the most reliable indication of time and the waxing moon too, obscured. For all that matters in such a brief instant, it may be only a dream. Before falling asleep, Ito remembers heaving-to against a force four Easterly wind. A sound of breaking waves would calm his spirit if he were on land. It’s a gesture from the sea reaching into a solid place on land of peace and comfort. Now however, in a little sailboat offshore a breaking wave is more the beacon of caution and gesticulation from afar that forces Ito from slumber or risk loss if convinced it’s only a dream. Far from shore, these gestures grow unease and fear rather than peace and comfort. Far from shore, the inherent peace of the little sailboat shatters within earshot of breaking waves. To stay the course while dreaming on shore may lead to deeper sleep, enveloped and smothered by peace and comfort flowing so easily in that world. However in a little sailboat it means no choice but an end to the sleepy aloof stance of mind and body. A choice to keep the distance means either action or destruction. It is a perfect pitch reaching deep.

An instant of perception lay upon fogged mind, body and sea in culmination from latent image ashore, Ito understands his stance and position. When at sea that slight lowering of wave intensity as it rolls away in static haze fills Ito with fear. When ashore, it never fades and gains audible strength to a climax once broken will rest sleeping mind and body at peace at the realization there is no destruction, no soaking no drowning. Only while at sea with decrescendo wave a once distant shore is now striking upon death’s door. Instantly. tiller is shoved athwartship. There is not time to mend sail, nor think unless Ito and the little sailboat have already passed beyond threashold onto a dreamy shore. What remain are fleeing images driven home by following sea then fade permanently at an instant. Now the little sailboat faces demise straight on only but for a second and smiles before raising her stern, making way through ground swelling pregnant waves and into distant sea. Away, away, away from lee shore into blinding fog, rested mind and spirit.

***MSG ID START***
Radio Email transmitting aboard Sailing Vessel LAGNIAPPE
DateTime : 2018-02-09 14:45:11
UTC DateTime : 2018-02-09 20:45:11Z
Day : Friday
UTC Day : Friday
Ship Callsign : KD0DVH /MM
USCG NO.1248074 :: SFJFC027C787
EPIRB BeaconID 2DCC5 EF14A FFBFF
RadioEmail: kd0dvh@winlink.org
Follow Lagniappe and her crew @
Mapshare link: https://share.garmin.com/lagniappe
GoogleEarth link: https://inreach.garmin.com/feed/ShareLoader/lagniappe Facebook Lagniappe aLittleSailboat
Twitter @sailLagniappe
***END TRANSMISSION***

Tour du Monde à la voile

Tour du Monde à la voile

belaj ventoj kaj sekvantaj maroj
fair winds and following seas

Voilier 'HIR 3'

HIR 3 is getting ready for another great adventure… We will sail around the World in 2018/19! Our route…

TOUR DU MONDE à la voile:

  1. Poreč – Cagliari (June 2018) – 10 days
  2. Cagliari – Gibraltar (July 2018) – 10 days
  3. Gibraltar – Canaries (July 2018) – 10 days
  4. Canaries – Cabo Verde (July 2018) – 10 days
  5. Cabo Verde – Cape Town (August/September 2018) – 45 days
  6. Cape Town – Freemanlte (September-November 2018) – 50 days
  7. Freemantle – Melbourne (November 2018) – 20 days
  8. Melbourne – Wellington (December 2018) – 20 days
  9. Wellington – Puerto Williams (December-February 2018/19) – 55 days
  10. Puerto Williams – Buenos Aires (February/March 2019) – 15 days
  11. Buenos Aires – Rio de Janeiro (March 2019) – 15 days
  12. Rio de Janeiro – Recife (March/April 2019) – 15 days
  13. Recife – Azores (April/May 2019) – 30 days
  14. Azores – Gibraltar ( May/June 2019) – 10 days
  15. Gibraltar –…

Vidi originalan afiŝon 17 pliaj vortoj

Heave-to & Heave-a-lee (leviĝu por levi lee)

One summer day sailing inland on Pensacola Bay, a isolated storm roiled down with some quick pretense seen on the water surface and dark looming horizon. Waves maybe two  feet so the waters were calm, but gusts easily topped force six for a few moments as the front passed. These brief isolated lows move quickly and seem to arrive right at that lazy moment of sun, cool gentle breeze and my personal bad habit of napping while Lagniappe sails herself.

Lagniappe’s staysail is always up, having one reef point which has never been used. Hard-a-lee positions her hove-to instantly, and brakes faster than dropping anchor. Lots of sail settings keeps her windward at one or two knots while stirring a windward slick. Full staysail without main and windward tiller is fine, a windward staysail and leeward main with two reefs and loose tiller gives a bit faster windward heave-to of about two knots. Surely lots of combinations left to discover for heaving-to depending on sea condition. Learning to effectively heave-to with Lagniappe is an important learned skill over the years. Lagniappe is born for heaving-to, much better than the Westsail 32, Lagniappe’s predecessor for this skipper.

So the devilish summer storms will blow Lagniappe to fifty degrees heel with full windward staysail without main and about the same or a little more with leeward main and two reefs. I prefer to keep her headsail bagged  with her full staysail and main set with two reefs for those days where force six gusts seem to appear at naptime.

Without reef points, and certainly with headsail, staysail and full main, Lagniappe will not come about in force five winds, as most boats will not. Should this be the case, then we sheet in her main and gybe cautiously so as to avoid the infamous Chinese Gybe (one reason she no longer carries a genoa). While sheeting her headsail and staysail to windward, we  drop her main, then headsail. Lagniappe’s sails are hanked-on for a quick drop.

Downhauls sound great but downhauls never work. During force four winds, they tangle and flap all over the place with sheets and halyards and sail feet during those precarious times of realizing my nap was  longer than it should have been. At the same time of trying to quickly shake nap-fog and regain rudder control, downhauls seem to increase Lagniappe’s face stinging bitch slap ability and trigger personal outbursts of sailing profanity. Not a pretty scene and certainly not suitable for proper seamanship aboard Lagniappe.

Staysail alone will not provide enough power without her main to maneuver in strong winds. Lagniappe’s staysail was loose footed for a few years, a bad habit learned aboard a Westsail 32. Rather, a sternly sheeted staysail and two reefed main is the preferred set. Lagniappe will come about up to force 6 winds if the seas are not much over three feet. For anything over force six, dropping her staysail should get her to come about, but by then I’ve already gybed and hove to with stern concentration on sphincter control.

Although a discourse of Lagniappe’s sails, I must not forget about Lagniappe’s one cylinder diesel thumper and feathering prop.

Pensacola pass is known for a quick turn of events.

One evening Lagniappe and her two crew left Big Lagoon for open water with five foot seas and a force 4 headwind. Staysail only at the time and free footed at that (a rookie mistake). Winds and seas building, Lagninappe would not come about and ten foot seas against the passs tide precluded a gybe. There was no room for heaving-to and she was in irons and loss of an effective rudder. Lagniappe’s engine started instantly and motored her and her two crew safely offshore. An hour later after the compulsory heave-to while heaving-a-lee and final collapse for twenty minutes on the cabin floor, we awoke to a smug and capable Lagniappe making a solid two knot headway and broad windward slick as if to casually reply ‘…um, really? … don’t embarrass me again, or stay home and I’ll do this by myself, okay?’.

It’s nightfall and seas continue to build. Our options are to stay at sea or go through the pass again and anchor. As a rookie not yet fully confident in the art of heaving-to with Lagniappe, we drop all sails and surf our way through the pass with ten foot seas. It was the first real trial with her feathering prop. There is something mysterious about it with a big wave from astern. I swear her prop kept Lagniappe from pitch-poling. As the wave lifts her stern and the surf begins (exhilarating!), her prop seems to flip and actually brake. I’m embarrassed to explain it because it smacks of ignorance and pride, but it’s true. Since then, I’ve cared for the engine and prop as if it’s a final lifeline for Lagniappe when the skipper can’t seem to get it right

Over time, engine and prop will likely play a lesser role, as Lagniappe gradually gives up her secrets as to what makes her happy in precarious seas.

Now, the skipper asks for a few moments of silence…

For the lost  and beloved tender ‘Bessie’.

Swamped and sent to an untimely demise during our misadventure.

She was a beautiful little tender.

If you want my opinion, Lagniappe never liked her anyway.

S/V LAGNIAPPE RadioEmail on 2018-01-12 12:42:40Z

Upon a body of blue water far from sight of land floats a death ship. Upon it, flat and square and in opposition to ocean swells and ocean waves and organic shape, sound and smell. The ship is not of the ocean. it is neither peaceful nor violent as there is no soul upon the gargantuan edifice. Ironically nature has a counterpart but on a much smaller scale and born of the ocean itself. I cannot see jellyfish or Portuguese Man-O-War but these organic forms could easily be discovered after a few days of observation.

Like a Venus Fly Trap, or Angler Fish, the man-made angular structure of steel and glass and wire awaits its own prey. As it floats dormant there is a palpable absence of activity. A pilothouse, the tallest structure aboard the death ship wraps within a solitary worker who alone has no interest in the ocean beauty which surrounds its prison. By all resistive nature of its man-made components, only that which supplants its mission of death is recognized. Ocean spray, swells, winds and glint of sun ray find no refuge and each denied acknowledgment of existence. From a distance I can see sun ray reflect and its inherent beauty and warmth greeting me as it leaves the glass lined pilot house finding a new home within my own soul. Taken from its intended destination, phytoplankton and sea forms robbed their birthright passage and I instead gain from wayward glint of sun ray and sea.
The death ship finds its prey and my own actions deliver it upon a flat lifeless deck. I watch as a beautiful whale is shredded into blood, flowing through scupper, poisoning blue water from which it was culled.
Within seconds the death ship is dormant again and ceases to exist in its own right, save a minuscule sentinel sense only to come alive and destroy again.
Upon a once blue ocean I stand in recognition of my own servitude as a destructive force of nature, as a monument for an existence forever changed. I gaze in silence upon blue ocean now polluted with blood and organ shreds once that of a peaceful mammal.

***MSG ID START***
Radio Email transmitting aboard Sailing Vessel LAGNIAPPE
DateTime : 2018-01-12 06:42:40
UTC DateTime : 2018-01-12 12:42:40Z
Day : Friday
UTC Day : Friday
Ship Callsign : KD0DVH /MM
USCG NO.1248074 :: SFJFC027C787
EPIRB BeaconID 2DCC5 EF14A FFBFF
RadioEmail: kd0dvh@winlink.org
Follow Lagniappe and her crew @
Mapshare link: https://share.garmin.com/lagniappe
GoogleEarth link: https://inreach.garmin.com/feed/ShareLoader/lagniappe

Facebook Lagniappe aLittleSailboat
Twitter @sailLagniappe
***END TRANSMISSION***

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